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Access Copyright: Reduce Fair Dealing, No Taping TV Shows or Format Shifting

Wednesday October 14, 2009
The Government continues to post copyright consultation submissions (still lots to go one month after the consultation concluded) with many making for interesting reading.  Access Copyright's submission is worth noting for two reasons.  First, rather than simply arguing against flexible fair dealing, it argues that the current fair dealing provision as interpreted by the Supreme Court of Canada is actually too broad.  It states:

Rather than an expansion of fair dealing, Access Copyright believes that it may be necessary to qualify the fair dealing provision as set out by the Supreme Court of Canada in the CCH decision, in order to ensure that Canada is compliant with the three-step test. Access Copyright contends that the fair dealing provision as interpreted by the Supreme Court of Canada conflicts with the normal exploitation of a work and causes an unreasonable loss of income to creators and publishers.

The collective goes on to say that research should be limited to non-commercial instances only (the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that there was no such limitation).  Access Copyright also takes aim at format and time shifting, submitting "that good public policy should not be dictated by legalizing common public practices." It is particularly concerned with format shifting, arguing for additional compensation for such exceptions.

The Government continues to post copyright consultation submissions (still lots to go one month after the consultation concluded) with many making for interesting reading.  Access Copyright's submission is worth noting for two reasons.  First, rather than simply arguing against flexible fair dealing, it argues that the current fair dealing provision as interpreted by the Supreme Court of Canada is actually too broad.  It states:

Rather than an expansion of fair dealing, Access Copyright believes that it may be necessary to qualify the fair dealing provision as set out by the Supreme Court of Canada in the CCH decision, in order to ensure that Canada is compliant with the three-step test. Access Copyright contends that the fair dealing provision as interpreted by the Supreme Court of Canada conflicts with the normal exploitation of a work and causes an unreasonable loss of income to creators and publishers.

The collective goes on to say that research should be limited to non-commercial instances only (the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that there was no such limitation).  Access Copyright also takes aim at format and time shifting, submitting "that good public policy should not be dictated by legalizing common public practices." It is particularly concerned with format shifting, arguing for additional compensation for such exceptions.